Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn Brewery’

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Brooklyn Brewery Announces 11-City Food & Arts Festival

February 7, 2013

Brooklyn Brewery Announces, “The Brooklyn Brewery Mash: Adventures in Food, Film, Music, Books & Beer”

11 City Tour, March–December 2013
Launches in Austin, TX at SxSW Interactive

FEBRUARY 7, 2013, BROOKLYN, NY – Brooklyn Brewery is taking its neighborhood on the road. Collaborating with friends old and new, the Brewery has bundled up some of its favorite events into The Brooklyn Brewery Mash as a benefit for Slow Food USA. Kicking off at SxSW Interactive in Austin, The Mash will drop in 11 cities during 2013 and roll out a roster of parties, comedy, concerts, pop-up supperclubs and readings, all featuring humanity’s favorite beverage.

“The Mash is an expression of Brooklyn art, music, food and the cultural links we see with many cities around the world,” says Brooklyn Brewery President & Co-founder Steve Hindy. “There is a revolution happening in the world of food and the world of beer, and we are happy to celebrate this revolution with our friends around the US.”

NYC food and art organizations have been closely linked to Brooklyn Brewery from the beginning. Be it a beer dinner, cook-off, concert or film festival, the ethos of these happenings has consistently mirrored the consideration and creativity behind the making of The Brewery’s beer. Paired with the flavor and flair of Brooklyn, classic nightlife is reimagined as a more interactive experience. During The Mash, participants will enjoy core and rare Brooklyn beers.

Helping color in The Mash, NBNY, the organizers of Brooklyn’s Bring to Light festival, will create their immersive installations of light and projection art throughout the tour. Continuing a tradition of giving back, Brooklyn Brewery cooked up The Mash as a benefit to Slow Food USA. Proceeds from every ticket sold will go to Slow Food chapters in each city.

“We’re absolutely delighted to have the support of the Brooklyn Brewery as it launches its Mash tour,” says Richard McCarthy, Executive Director of Slow Food USA. “Brooklyn Brewmaster Garrett Oliver has been a Slow Food supporter for a long time and we’re looking forward to the celebrations in the various local communities.”

AUSTIN EVENTS: MARCH 4 – 10

Chaos Cooking

Wed, Mar 6, 7pm | A stalwart citizen opens their home kitchen to strangers for a dinner party where all guests are cooks. Each attendee brings the ingredients and everyone cooks together. Dishes are passed around, and there’s plenty of Brooklyn beer to enjoy. Location is secret – go to ChaosCooking.com for details.

Local 2 Ways

Thu, Mar 7, 7pm; Swift’s Attic, 315 Congress Ave, Austin, TX | Multi-course dinner celebrating regional cuisine interpreted 2 ways: by Chef Mat Clouser of Swift’s Attic and the Brooklyn Brewery House Chef Andrew Gerson.

Slow Supper, Beer & Books: An Evening with Marcus Samuelsson & Jesse Griffiths

Fri, Mar 8, 6pm; Springdale Farm, 755 Springdale Rd, Austin, TX – $100 | Food RepublicTogather & Brooklyn Brewery present Beer & Books: Marcus Samuelsson and Austin’s own Jesse Griffiths in a conversation about technology’s effect on the food world. Following is Slow Supper, an outdoor dinner party at this beautiful urban farm benefitting Slow Food Austin co-created by Samuelsson & Griffiths with a helping hand from Brooklyn Brewery’s House Chef. Stay for the free Soul Clap & Dance-Off immediately following at 9pm.

NY Night Train Soul Clap & Dance-Off with DJ Mr. Jonathan Toubin

Fri, Mar 8, 9pm; Springdale Farm, 755 Springdale Rd, Austin, TX – Free | America’s most popular soul party returns to Austin. Get down to the exquisite 1960s soul 45s of world famous Brooklyn DJ Jonathan Toubin all night long. Join the 11pm dance contest for $100 cash prize and a trip to New York for the Dance-Off championship at Brooklyn Bowl.

Farmers Market Workshop

Sat, Mar 9, 10am–12pm; Cedar Park Farmers Mkt, 11200 Lakeline Mall Drive, Cedar Park, TX

Sun, Mar 10, 10am–12pm; Mueller Farmers Mkt, Browning Hangar, 4550 Mueller Blvd, Austin, TX

The Brooklyn Brewery House Chef will be cooking up some of his favorite finds from the market. And drinking beer. Stop by for a sip and a cooking tip.

The Austin Smoke Experiment

Sun, Mar 10, 1–4pm; Clive Bar, 609 Davis St, Austin, TX – $15 | Austin’s top home chefs create their best smoke-themed dish ranging from savory to sweet. Some wear costumes, some pimp out their table, but all come to win over the audience and our esteemed culinary judging panel. The Food Experiments return to SxSW for the third year in a row.

The SxSW Marketing Party

Sun, Mar 10, 7:30pm; Clive Bar, 609 Davis St, Austin, TX – Free | Brooklyn Brewery, Imgur & Found Footage are throwing a party featuring music by Brooklyn bands Prince RamaSinkane and The Dig, odd, rare and outrageous VHS clips from Found Footage Festival, projection art by Nuit Blanche and beer from Brooklyn Brewery.

 

THE TOUR

Every installment of The Mash is custom tailored to the cities it visits. Go to BrooklynBreweryMash.com for info on the rest of the tour.

 AUSTIN, TX: March 4 – 10

NEW ORLEANS, LA: March 13 – 16*

NASHVILLE, TN: April 11 – 14

BOSTON, MA: April 25 – 28

BALTIMORE, MD: May 2 – 5

TWIN CITIES, MN: June 20 – 23

WASHINGTON, D.C.: September 19 – 22

CHICAGO, IL: October 3 – 6*

PITTSBURGH, PA: October 24 – 27

PHILADELPHIA, PA:  November 7 – 10*

MIAMI, FL: December 12 – 15

* with Vendy Awards

ABOUT

 Slow Food USA is part of a global movement, which believes everyone has the right to good, clean, and fair food. With over 250,000 supporters, 25,000 members and 225 chapters nationwide, Slow Food USA advocates for food and farming policy that is good for the public, good for the planet, and good for farmers and workers.

 Food Republic, our media partner, explores the culture of food through stories, interviews, global conversations, and experiences. This is the site for men who want to eat and drink well, and to live smart. Food Republic aims to be the global hub for news and information about the new culture of food across a multitude of media platforms, for a vibrant community of people who put food and drink at the center of their lives.

 The Vendy Awards is NYC’s premier street food showcase and an intense cook-off between the best sidewalk chefs. The Vendys is a fundraiser for the Street Vendor Project, a membership-based non-profit organization that stands up for vendors’ rights.

Togather is a new literary resource that connects authors directly with readers to fansource events and make great cultural experiences accessible to audiences everywhere.

Found Footage Festival is a hilarious event that showcases footage from videos that were found at garage sales and thrift stores and in warehouses and dumpsters across the country.

Nuit Blanche New York (NBNY) designs, curates, and produces installations of light, sound, and projection art. They collaborate with leading contemporary artists to create immersive experiences that uniquely engage audiences. Their nighttime events explore new artistic mediums through site-specific interventions at the intersection of art, technology, and multimedia performance.

 

LINKS

 The Mash: BrooklynBreweryMash.com

The Mash on TumblrBrooklynBreweryMash.tumblr.com

Brooklyn Brewery on FacebookFacebook.com/TheBrooklynBrewery

Twitter @BrooklynBrewery

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Brewery’s Dry Irish Stout

January 25, 2013

The beer I enjoy often depends on the season.  In the summer I like a good IPA, in the fall I tend towards a nut brown ale to a porter, but my favorite time of year for beer is winter, when I can enjoy a nice stout in front of a roaring fire.  Brooklyn Brewery read my mind recently and sent me samples of their Dry Irish Stout.  Thank you, Brooklyn folks!

About the beer
From the Brooklyn website:

Brooklyn Irish Stout is brewed the old-fashioned way, without the nitrogen addition. A large portion of the grain is roasted like coffee beans, developing the typical color and flavor of this beer. Aside from British pale malts, the beer includes caramel malts, black patent malt, unmalted black barley and a proportion of flaked raw barley, which helps the beer develop a beautiful, thick natural head. The famous East Kent Golding hop lends to the earthy aroma. The beer is neither filtered, nor fined and has a light, brisk carbonation. The blend of grains gives the beer an espresso-like bite, followed by coffee and chocolate flavors.

The Pour
This poured a dark brown with red undertones.  A beautiful tan head, one finger thick, topped off the beer, leaving decent lacing on the glass.

The Nose
This beer has one great nose.  Chocolatey, earthy and slightly hoppy, with lots of great roasted malt.  Just a complex, tasty nose.  You almost want to just keep inhaling its bouquet, but it’s so alluring you just have to taste it.

The Taste
The nose definitely alludes to the flavors to come.  At first this beer is very carbonated, moreso than I expect from a stout.  There are light chocolatey flavors there, released by the effervescence.  You quickly realize it is a dry beer, but one that carries a minor level of sweetness with it.  As the beer warms, more earthy flavors come out, almost a peat note that is most fitting with an Irish stout.  I realized after a couple of tastings of the beer that the chocolate and earthy flavors linger on the palate for some time, which is a good experience.  There is a lot of complexity here to be deciphered and enjoyed.

Scoring Breakdown

Appearance: Attractive beer, I like that it’s not pitch black but has some hint of color. 9 points out of 10

Nose: Very good nose, very interesting and representative, but leaving some things to the imagination. 14 out of 15

Taste: Good complexity and depth of flavor, good stout flavors, but in probably the most drinkable stout I’ve had. 48 out of 55

Style: Very appropriate representation of the style.  18 out of 20

Total rating: 89 points out of 100.

In a nutshell: A lot of people shy away from stouts because they see them as heavy and weighty, and not at all something to enjoy casually with friends, but this definitely puts those misconceptions to rest.  This is a great beer if you still want to enjoy a nice roasty beer for winter but don’t want to feel sluggish and full after a couple of beers.  Very tasty and complex.

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout

March 29, 2012

Ahhh, Brooklyn Brewerybrooklyn black chocolate stout…one of my favorite breweries right now.  Their beers, or the ones I have tried thus far, seem to be consistently of high quality and quite tasty.  It’s hard to find a brewery that consistently good.  According to Brooklyn, Black Chocolate Stout is their award-winning rendition of the Imperial Stout style, once made exclusively for Catherine the Great. (The style, that is…I don’t think Brooklyn Brewery has existed since Catherine the Great’s time 😉 ).  According to the fact sheet that accompanied the beer, they, “use three mashes to brew each batch of this beer, achieving a luscious deep dark chocolate flavor through a blend of specially roasted malts.”

The beer is brewed using American two-row pale malt, caramel malt, malted wheat and a blend of American roasted malts and barleys.  Willamette and American Fuggle hops are also part of this elixir.  This beer weighs in at a hefty 10% ABV.

The Pour
This beer practically oozes out of the bottle, a thick, syrupy black beer with a thin coffee-with-cream colored head sitting weakly atop the stoutness of this brew.  Coming out of the bottle, it almost resembles thick chocolate syrup.

The Nose
This smells, to me, pretty much the way I like a stout to smell.  Chocolate, dark dried fruit, wood and smoke all mingle together to tell you, “Yep, you’re drinking a stout. Throw another log on the fire, sit back, relax, and enjoy the experience.”

The Taste
With a thick and viscous mouthfeel, the tastes of wood, smoke, chocolate and roasted malt want to coat the palette and linger for the winter, but a pretty dry finish comes along and prepares you for the next mouthful.  There is more of a bitterness to this than I expected, which to my mind makes it a good middle ground where a drier stout meets a sweeter stout and both win in their own way.

Scoring Breakdown

Appearance: A nice dark, thick pour with a nicely colored head, though it doesn’t last. 8 points out of 10

Nose: As expected, a strong nose with good stout characteristics. 13 out of 15

Taste: Good dark stout flavor profile but with a bitterness that positions it as a good compromise between a drier stout and a sweeter stout. 45 out of 55

Style: This fits the Imperial Stout style to a T.  Perfect example of the style. 20 out of 20

Total rating: 86 points out of 100.

In a nutshell: A great beer to sit in front of a fire with, to let the smoke and wood of the fire mingle with the smoke and wood in the flavor profile.

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Brewery’s Winter Ale

February 23, 2012

It was in the 70s here in Nashville today (in February!) and tomorrow night it will be 29 degrees. Might as well review a winter beer while I still can! This one was sent to me from Brooklyn Brewery, and it is their Winter Ale. I’m a big fan of Brooklyn Brewery, so I was excited when I saw the package on my doorstep!

According to the Brooklyn Brewery website, this Scottish-style ale features Scottish Floor-malted Maris Otter, English crystal malts, Belgian Aromatic malt, American roasted malts, American oats, and Willamette hops. According to me, it’s a tasty Scottish-style ale indeed.

The Pour
This caramel-colored ale comes, poured correctly, topped with a 2-finger thick fluffy beige head comprised of tiny delicate bubbles that cling to the glass.  The beer itself resembles a cola in which the ice has been allowed to melt, but with reddish undertones.

The Nose
The nose features some woody-ness and peat, hints of bourbon, slight tart cherry hints and a sweet and toasty malt backbone.  There seems to be a slight whisper of chocolate as well.  All in all, a very interesting nose with a lot to show off.

The Taste
This beer comes across malty and sweet, but with a crisp edge, not at all cloying.  The nose definitely alluded to the nice flavors within, as a woody and peaty character is introduced, with subtle nutty and chocolatey accompaniment on the finish.  There’s a very good depth of flavor here, and the peat and wood really speak to all that is winter.  There is even a slight sourness that edges forward as the beer warms.  This beer is medium/full-bodied, with a mouthfeel that is both crisp and slightly cloying.  The flavors tend to stick around on the palette, which is not at all a bad thing.

Scoring Breakdown

Appearance: A nice head floats atop this beer that shows a good rich coloring, quite appropriate for the richness within, waiting to be quaffed.
8 points out of 10

Nose: Smells great, and rich, and lets you in on what to expect on the palate, without betraying all the flavor notes.
14 out of 15

Taste: Good malty, earthy flavor, with good depth and really spotlighting a lot of characteristics I enjoy, such as slight chocolatey hints and tart cherry, as well as a sourness that arises as it warms and breathes.
49 out of 55

Style: When I think of a Scottish-style ale, I think of a deep, rich earthy flavor, and this beer delivers that, to be sure.  But it does it in a way that is far from one-note, showcasing other complementary flavors and profiles.  This is an example of a beer that takes a style and fits it, then does even better.
19 out of 20

Total rating: 90 points out of 100.

In a nutshell: If you like a Scottish ale but want one that isn’t so earthy you think you’ve been buried alive, this is the beer for you. Excellent, excellent brew.

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Beer review: Brooklyn Summer Ale

August 16, 2011

Brooklyn Summer AleI first encountered Brooklyn Brewery in Panama City Beach, thanks to Chan’s Wine World, but that was in a collaborative effort with Franziskaner.  It wasn’t until later, back here in Tennessee, that I experienced Brooklyn’s brews on their own, and I am a fan thus far.  I was hoping they would someday send me samples to review, and I am happy to report that this year they contacted me, offering review samples.  I was sent their Summer Ale and their Sorachi Ace, which I will review later. More: Beer review: Brooklyn Summer Ale

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Beer Review: Schneider-Weisse Brewery and Brooklyn Brewery: Hopfen Weisse

October 9, 2010

Schneider Weisse BreweryToday’s beer review is another one courtesy of Aleksey’s Imports: Schneider-Weisse and Brooklyn Brewery‘s Hopfenweisse. I had this beer in Panama City Beach a couple of years ago (bought it at my favorite PCB beer destination, Chan’s Wine World) but lost the tasting notes and never got a chance to review it.  I’m now glad I did, because I feel like I can appreciate this beer so much more now, although I did think it was mighty tasty when I last tried it.

The Pour
This beer showed off a dense one-finger-thick, very light beige head, resting atop an orange medium amber brew.  It was so hazy it was almost completely opaque.  I just know I’ll be finding some tasty sediment at the bottom of the bottle!

The Nose
This has a good wheaty nose, but with floral (and very slightly grassy) and citrusy hop notes.  There’s a faint spiciness to it as well, but overall, this is a really good nose.

The Taste
This is an extremely smooth hefeweizen with a very good hop flavor, but without excessive hop bitterness.  The bitterness of the hops really only comes out on the finish, but it’s still subtle.  The beer has hints of apricot and banana and is actually sweeter than you expect, but the hops make themselves known, showing off subtly floral and citrus flavors.  I was picking up lemon and tangerine there.  There also seems to be a slightly musty woodiness to it.  The hops and the higher ABV really bloom on the finish.  This beer is medium bodied and with a silky mouthfeel, and I enjoyed how the apricot and banana really seemed to linger on the finish.  The alcohol definitely catches up to you though.

Scoring Breakdown

Appearance: I like the orangey-amber color and the haziness promises good things to come.
8 points out of 10.

Nose: The nose definitely tells of things to come, and smells wonderful.
13 points out of 15.

Taste: The mouthfeel and flavors all work together very nicely here.  The flavor also has a very good complexity and depth to enjoy.
50 points out of 55.

Style: A great example of a hefeweizen.  The hops just add an extra dimension and character to this ale.
20 points out of 20.

Total rating: 91 points

In a nutshell:  This is an exceptionally tasty and unique hefeweizen from two great breweries.

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Brewery’s Brooklyn Lager

January 16, 2010

I’ve only recently experienced Brooklyn Brewery‘s beers firsthand, though I’ve heard nothing but good things about them for some time.  I first tried this Brooklyn Lager after trying their Brooklyn Brown Ale, but just recently found the tasting notes, so I thought I’d post it.

About The Brewer
Brooklyn Brewery was started in 1997 by, oddly enough, a former Associated Press Middle East correspondent (Steve Hindy) and a banker (Tom Potter).  The brewery is involved in many different charitable causes and even takes advantage of wind power. In 2003, Brooklyn Brewery became the first New York City company to switch to 100% wind-generated electricity. Incidentally, Linus Hall of Yazoo Brewing here in Nashville, interned with Brooklyn Brewery.

About The Beer
This beer is an American Amber Lager, brewed with American Two-Row Malts and Hallertauer Mittelfrueh, Vanguard and Cascade hops.

According to the bottle:

Amber gold, with a malty body and a floral hop character, Brooklyn Lager is a revival of Brooklyn’s pre-Prohibition all malt lagers.

The Pour
This pours to a nice, thick two-finger pillowy head that consists of a very light tan color and tiny bubbles. The beer is a great, clear amber color. The head settles a good bit quite quickly.

The Nose
What is that? This smells of malt and hops but something else is in there, hiding. I can slowly coax out good floral hoppy notes and hints of yeast, with very intriguing butterscotch or caramel notes reluctantly being drawn out of the glass.

The Taste
This beer lays down the standard lager foundation, but modifies it with a slightly sweet maltiness and slightly bitter hoppiness vying for attention on the palate.  The yeast almost gives it a breadiness as well. Medium bodied, this beer is very smooth and eminently drinkable. With repeated samplings, the slight hints of butterscotch or caramel found in the nose make teasing appearances on the palate. As it warms, a slightly spicy sourness develops on the finish.

Overall
If you’ve read some of my other reviews, you know I’m not a fan of lagers. I usually find them lacking in character and depth, and without a unique personality. This is a definite exception. I find this one intriguing and tasty. The hidden depths of flavors give you plenty to explore.

Recommended: Definitely.  This is a really good beer….as a lager, it is exceptional!

Price: $8.39/6-pack at Midtown Wine and Spirits

ABV: 5.2%

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Beer Review: Brooklyn Brewery Brown Ale

May 6, 2009

This beer review is in honor of finishing this semester. Initially I thought I would try to find a beer whose name somehow related to school, but when I saw Brooklyn Brewery products were now available in Nashville, all bets were off! I only saw the Brown Ale and the Lager available, and being the brown ale fan I am, I went with Brooklyn Brewery’s Brown Ale. You know what they say, “Brown will never let you down”. Well, maybe someone somewhere said it once.

On to the beer….

According to the neck of the bottle:

Richly mahogany in color, Brooklyn Brown Ale is richer and hoppier than its mild and malty English forebears. Chocolate and coffee flavors punctuate the roasty malt background.

The Pour
This pours with a light beige, two and a half finger thick head, consisting of somewhat loose bubbles and leaving, at first, only a tiny bit of lacing on the side of the pint glass. As you drink the beer, more prominent lacing is evident. It is indeed a mahogany color as the neck of the bottle mentions. Held up to the light it looks quite light bodied.

The Nose
Excellent malty notes are the first thing you notice. There are definite oak notes and roasted and smoky notes, as well as a hidden sweetness. Smells terrific.

The Taste
First reaction: there is more hop to it than I expected. (I didn’t read the neck of the bottle until I finished my first bottle.) There is definite oak in the taste, as well as a dry dusty dark chocolate profile. It seems kind of light bodied and smooth, but with a slight crispness occasionally making itself known. There is a little sweetness on the finish. The hops give it a dryness but not a bitterness or sourness. With the oak and the somewhat light body, this is sort of like a brown ale version of an dry oaky merlot.

Overall
This is an experience beer. An experience beer is what I call those beers that are unique and interesting, but not something you would drink a lot of. This is more for savoring and enjoying. It just gets drier as you drink it, and reminds you more and more of a merlot tinged with chocolate. Overall it is beginning to grow on me.

Recommended: This is not a beer for everyone. It is quite dry and is more a beer to try and to savor. I would recommend any beer connosseiur give it a shot.

Price: I paid about $1.75 per 12 oz. bottle.

ABV: 5.6%

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